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Lin Hung-Hsin
LAST UPDATE : 2018.02.6 / EDITOR : tcaaintern
3 artworks / 33 exhibition

Born in Yunlin, Taiwan in 1975, Lin Hung-Hsin received his MFA from the National Taiwan University of Arts.

Before being devoted to artistic practice as a full-time artist, Lin had been working as an advertising designer for almost 15 years. His paintings feature a realistic expression, but are different from the objective representation of the American photorealism. Instead, he adopts a strong subjective perspective while combining two-dimensional vector symbols and images of visual spaces with his personal experiences and illusions. In his works, he intentionally simplifies the colors and the composition. Through the objects, the symbols, the colors, and the contours in the paintings, Lin creates a connection with the realistic subjects (figures) to visualize his inner perception of the surroundings.

He borrows the character “flâneur” from Walter Benjamin’s (1892-1940) works as the main subject in his works. With the face painted with white powder and the costume corresponding to the environment, the flâneur anonymously observes the city. The “flâneur” in Lin’s paintings is a complicated self-reflection of the artist, through which the artist offers himself a temporary getaway from the reality so that he can take shelter in his subconscious self-indulgence. Through these portraits in various sizes, Lin attempts to challenge viewers’ visual experience and the way they see a painting, creating a connection beyond time and space.

Lin Hung-Hsin has participated in many art competitions and received several awards in Taiwan. In 2012 and 2016, he had solo exhibitions named “A Place to Turn Around” and “A Collection of Microcracks” at Liang Gallery. Lin’s works had been exhibited in Beijing, Shanghai, London and Singapore. He currently lives and works in Hsinchu.

If a person’s thoughts can be transformed and reflected into a virtual character, then I will call it a “flâneur,” who mixes the personal life, experience, emotion, observation, imagination, fantasy and so on. The term comes from the character “flâneur” in Walter Benjamin’s (1892-1940) works. It represents a complicated self-reflection while one wanders about the arcade, which does not exist in the reality.

The “flâneur” in my works does not wander about the Parisian arcade. Instead, it represents an attitude to anonymously observe the modern life experiences in a city without being part of it. Taipei, the city I live in, is where I start to explore the experiences as a flâneur! As an alien living in Taipei, I always find myself in a position as an observer/immigrant to observe, to experience, to fantasize, and to wander about the city. Through the need of an individual, one obtains the authority over one’s own body and soul in front of the social forces. The rapid advancement of technology creates a media effect, which is beyond an “imperial panorama” in Walter Benjamin’s word. The modern technology allows one to hide oneself in the crowd while observing or peeking around from one Internet community to another in the cyberspace – to look for a place to turn around. The flâneur is like an anonymous inspector who disguises oneself in the crowd, looking for inspiration and to collect them as the trophies to fulfill the poetry. As an observer in an alienated position, the flâneur seems to care about nothing but peek into the city with one’s great vision.

The flâneur calmly searches and observes the trend of the world with rationality. Showing no emotion on the face, the flâneur either walks around in the crowd or indulges oneself in the surrounding situations. He seems to be absent-minded, hiding himself in the crowd without a clear destination to go, but he indeed has clear thoughts. His facial expressions and movements are frozen, while his rational mind moves in various directions, alienating himself from the rest of the world as if he is a “wandering ghost” who stands high to see the city and the people living in. The seemingly absent-minded look might be the most natural state of human beings. It is the most real expression without any pretense or constraint. Once such an expression, posture, or behavior is captured and emphasized, the effect it creates can be particularly strong.
In my paintings, the depth of the space, which is commonly seen in realistic painting, has been removed and replaced with simplified two-dimensional symbols to represent the unknown space or the fantasized situation. Sometimes it reflects certain reality, which is contradictory to the delicate and rich realistic quality of the figures in the images. The conflict between the two surprisingly creates an unexpected stability and an appropriate narrative in the paintings. When we further look into the works, the space designed in the images does not exist in reality. Instead, it is an enclosed space, which combines the space of the real life and the space of the fantasy – there is no light refracted in a reasonable way. In such an enclosed space, one can only slowly float above and roam around. I have once suffered from middle ear infection, causing me ear pain. It is indeed a painful experience for me. Since the eardrum failed to vibrate in a normal way, I could hear nothing but the ringing in the ears. I was thus imprisoned in a situation with no one to intrude as if I was in a submarine diving deep in the peaceful sea. The unceasing ringing in the ears was like the deep sound created by the sonar. The only difference was that it could not transmit any message to the outside world. The sound waves hit the tympanic membrane back and forth, intensifying the isolation state from the external world. The exquisitely detailed representation attracts viewers to take a step closer as if the artist intends to capture the viewers’ “immersion” through a mirror.

The models’ faces are painted in white so that they can be de-characterized. The strange costume, which does not fit in the situation, also suggests certain quality or personality of weirdness, implying the characters’ intention to hide in the crowd while also maintaining some contradictory strangeness to represent the unnatural state. The sincere expressions are enlarged in proportion to create out-of-focus effect. It seems the characters are looking into viewers’ eyes with unnoticeable affection like a deja vu. The face no longer represents the particular “someone” but “anyone!” It is a contradictory realization that only when we remove the original identity can we really reflect the true selves. Indeed, the pretended expression of the actors is the true face of me – the face of a wandering flâneur. When it comes to the gender of the characters in the paintings, the men represent myself while the women represent the curiosity about the opposite sex hidden in everyone’s heart.

My paintings are based upon my fictional fantasy or my response to something, through which I create certain facial expression or situation. Sometimes, I start from my life experiences, what I have achieved, what I have been fantasizing while being alone, or my perspectives on my life and the surroundings. I collect these thoughts and rearrange them, making them into a narrative of the reflection of various characters. The journey of the wandering flâneur does not follow a route. He gets lost in a city and then returns to the starting point with his rational mind and the sense of direction, which he was born with.

Before I became a full-time artist, I worked as an advertising designer. I have been educated with two talents – design and realistic painting – while the co-existence between the two creates an unexpected effect. The conflict between the silence and the instant movement establishes certain harmony! The colors being used and the composition of my paintings are intentionally simplified and the large-scale blankness presents a space of infinity. I also use a great amount of two-dimensional symbols to express my supposition and my logic, to imply my worries, and to build up the connection with the realistic characters. The curve line beside the ear and the geometric color plane represent the self-enclosed status of the flâneur – with the deep drumming sound while wandering about the space. The minimalist colors and the simplified plane both construct a peaceful space, which meanwhile highlight the intensity created by the realistic subjects with its deep strong ringing sound.

birth year
1975
Place of Birth
Yunlin
Taiwan
Place of Residence
Hsinchu
Taiwan
education
2011
MFA Department of Fine Arts
National Taiwan University of Arts
2004
BFA Department of Fine Arts
National Taiwan University of Arts
...More
CURRICULUM VITAE
2016
“A Collection of Microcracks”
Liang Gallery , Taipei , Taiwan
2014
“Art Solo 2014”
Expo Dome , Taipei , Taiwan
2012
“A Place to Turn Around”
Liang Gallery , Taipei , Taiwan
2011
“Flâneur”
National Taiwan University of Arts , Taipei , Taiwan
2004
“Gray Poetry”
UNO Restaurant , Taipei , Taiwan
2016
“Art Taipei 2016”
Taipei World Trade Center , Taipei , Taiwan
2016
“Zhuang Tai”
Yuan Ze University Arts Center , Taoyuan , Taiwan
2015
“Art Taipei 2015”
Taipei World Trade Center , Taipei , Taiwan
2015
“Art in the Library II – Summer Festival Exhibition”
Liang Gallery , Taipei , Taiwan
2015
“Art15 London”
Olympia Grand , London , United Kingdom
2015
“Freshness of March”
Liang Gallery , Taipei , Taiwan
2014
“Art Kaohsiung 2014”
The Pier-2 Art Center , Kaohsiung , Taiwan
2014
“Walking by Taiwanese Art: 1927-2014”
Liang Gallery , Taipei , Taiwan
2014
“Art Taipei 2014”
Taipei World Trade Center , Taipei , Taiwan
2014
“2014 Taiwan Biennial – Yes, Taiwan”
National Taiwan Museum of Fine Arts , Taichung , Taiwan
2014
“BolognaFiere Shanghai – International Contemporary Art Exhibition”
Shanghai Exhibition Centre , Shanghai , China
2014
“Art Taichung 2014”
Millennium Hotels , Taichung , Taiwan
2014
“Young Art Taipei 2014”
Regent Taipei Hotel , Taipei , Taiwan
2014
“Art Tainan 2014”
Tayih Landis Hotel , Tainan , Taiwan
2014
“Art14 London”
Olympia Grand , London , United Kingdom
2014
“Kiss Kiss My Baby Charity Event”
Liang Gallery , Taipei , Taiwan
2014
“Art Stage Singapore 2014”
Marina Bay Sands Singapore
2013
“Art Kaohsiung 2013”
The Pier-2 Art Center , Kaohsiung , Taiwan
2012
“Art Taipei 2012”
Taipei World Trade Center , Taipei , Taiwan
2012
“Exploring with a Balloon – Taiwan Contemporary Art Exhibition”
Liang Gallery , Taipei , Taiwan
2012
“The Delightful Color of Spring”
Liang Gallery , Taipei , Taiwan
2011
“Celebrating Spring Together – Group Exhibition of Ten Contemporary Artists”
Liang Gallery , Taipei , Taiwan
2011
“The Art Exhibition of Chiayi City Collection”
Hsinchu and Keelung City Cultural Center , Hsinchu, Keelung , Taiwan
2010
“The Exhibition of Kaohsiung Awards”
Kaohsiung Museum of Fine Arts , Kaohsiung , Taiwan
2009
“Contemporary Light Track Through the History”
Beitou Citizens Activities Center , Taipei , Taiwan
2008
“National Taiwan University of Arts, Department of Fine Arts Graduate School Master Student Exhibition”
Hsinchu Railway Art Village , Hsinchu , Taiwan
2006
“Gleaners: The Art Exhibition of Chiayi City Collection”
Chiayi City Cultural Center , Chiayi , Taiwan
2003
“Fu Zhou: Talking Nonsense”
Banqiao Community College , New Taipei City , Taiwan
2010
Selected
Kaohsiung Awards
 
Kaohsiung , Taiwan
2009
3rd Place
National Taiwan University of Arts Graduate Work Publication
National Taiwan University of Arts
Taipei , Taiwan
2004
Merit Award in Water Color Painting
The 58th Taiwan Provincial Fine Arts Exhibition
 
Taiwan
2004
Merit Award in Oil Painting
The UBF Rising Artist Award by Union Culture Foundation
 
Taiwan
2003
2nd Place in Oil Painting
Student Teacher Group Exhibition of National Taiwan University of Arts
National Taiwan University of Arts
Taipei , Taiwan
2002
2nd Place in Water Color Painting
The 56th Taiwan Provincial Fine Arts Exhibition
 
Taiwan
2001
Merit Award
National Taiwan University of Arts Campus Anniversary Exhibition
National Taiwan University of Arts
Taipei , Taiwan
2001
1st Place
The Art Exhibition of Chiayi City
Cultural Affairs Bureau of Chiayi City
Chiayi , Taiwan
TAGS
SELECTED ARTWORKS
oil,canvas,
162x130 cm
01 / 10
Flaneur: Disappear Scenery
Painting ,
oil,canvas,
130x162 cm
01 / 10
Flaneur: To better future
Painting ,
oil,canvas,
162x130 cm
01 / 10
Flâneur: The Third Wish
Painting ,
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